Regions with Highest and Lowest Number of Registered Architects

Regions with Highest and Lowest Number of Registered Architects

Regions with Highest and Lowest Number of Registered Architects

DATE PUBLISHED: APR 1, 2021 

Nikko Wedding Chapel in Guam

Regions with Highest and Lowest Number of Registered U.S. Architects

Through its annual Survey of Architectural Registration Boards in June 2020, NCARB found that California leads the country with the highest number of total architects (both resident and reciprocal licensure-holders) with 21,528 people. While the number of architects continues to grow, the smallest number of architects practicing today is in Guam (99) and the Northern Mariana Islands (39).

RIM Architects is fortunate to have registered architects in each of these regions (California, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands) as well as Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

RIM’s Guam Office Is Very Active

In an article written for the Marianas Business Journal, Maureen Maratita, Journal Staff, wrote: “There are not many businesses that prosper in Guam and are then able to export their skills to elsewhere in the U.S. RIM Architects is one of them, with offices in Guam, Hawaii, Alaska and California. CEO David L. McVeigh, who is based in Anchorage, Alaska, was in Guam from 1988 to 2000, and at the forefront of the group’s development.”

McVeigh commented, “We started the company in 1986 and I was one of the original hires. In Guam — where Brent L. Wiese is the managing principal — all staff have been with RIM for more than a decade. Close to 40% of its total staff have been with RIM for more than a decade. “We’ve been really fortunate to have staff that believe in us, that like our culture, our work environment; they stay with us quite a while—particularly in Guam.”

The Guam office has always had a lot of resort work, he added. “We’ve probably touched most of the hotels on Tumon Bay.” Most recently, RIM was the Guam Partner of Record for the Tsubaki Tower and heavily involved. “We worked with the architect [in Japan] to do all the design drawings and the construction administration, and to get it permitted.” McVeigh said. “It’s a beautiful building and a great first-class addition to Guam’s inventory,” he said.

RIM Architects is the Architect of Record for The Tsubaki Tower. – Photography: Mike Arty

“Top Guam projects include the $44-million design-build MACC task order awarded in early August to the Black Construction Corp.-Tutor Perini joint venture for ordnance facilities at Naval Base Guam; the $180-million Tsubaki Tower in Tumon in Guam, for which RIM was the Architect of Record; and Isa Villas affordable housing on Capitol Hill in Saipan.

Other work in the Mariana Islands includes school retrofits and additions in Saipan and two projects in Guam and one in Saipan for the Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints.

Bank Pacific Guam – Photography: Mike Arty

RIM has also acted for off-island companies who are unfamiliar with Guam. “You can’t undervalue the importance of having boots on the ground, particularly in places like Guam where anything from logistics to the design environment itself – when you get companies that are from somewhere else — they don’t always understand that it’s the little things that make a big difference. Some of the difference is cultural, he said. “Some of it is the way the entitlements work and development works. … It’s always wise if they hook up with somebody local.”

Architectural rendering of Soka Gakkai Buddhist Center in Guam, by RIM Architects

McVeigh said he is proud of his time in Guam. “I feel it had a lot to do with where I am today.”

To read the full article, please click here: https://www.mbjguam.com/2020/09/07/architectural-firm-draws-on-skills-to-develop-broad-business/

Architectural Preservation on the Big Island of Hawaii

Architectural Preservation on the Big Island of Hawaii

Architectural Preservation on the Big Island of Hawaii

DATE PUBLISHED: APR 1, 2021 

Paula de la Cruz interviews Eric Nelson of RIM Architects

by Paloola Podcast - Paula de la Cruz | Architectural Preservation on the Big Island in Hawaii

Hawaii’s historic Volcano House is one of RIM Architects’ early renovation projects.

Architectural Preservation on the Big Island in Hawaii

Paula de la Cruz interviews Eric Nelson of RIM Architects in her recent podcast. In it, she explores the significance and challenges of renovating Hawaii’s Big Island projects including the Mauna Lani Resort and the historic Volcano House (shown here).

Paula de la Cruz: The whole of the Big Island is a mountain (or five mountains actually) offering breathtaking yin and yang experiences. Eric Nelson of RIM Architects, Architect of Record for Mauna Lani’s renovation, discusses making bold choices to highlight, not just views of the Pacific, but an ocean of lava and magma—and the influence of modern Hawaii-based architects on his work. His motto has always been “jump and the nets will appear.”

The architecture of Vladimir Ossipoff, a Siberian-born, American architect who brought modern architecture to Hawaii, transformed the lanai into a building in itself. I am sure that throughout your career you have used a variation of the lanai. Also, do you feel that you were influenced by Ossipoff’s work?

Eric Nelson: Yes. I think every architect in Hawaii is. I was also influenced by Charles W. Dickey. This is, you know, an older architecture, but for Hawaii, it was a big influence on the double- pitched roofs. I had the opportunity of designing the renovation of Volcano House at the Volcano National Park. That was really fun! It wasn’t one of Dickey’s greatest buildings, but it is well loved. It sits right on the Caldera. When you’re in the building, you look down into the Caldera.

So, my challenge really was to go in and reconfigure the whole thing in order to get back to the original spirit of the building. And originally there was a deck, so we added a new deck. Somebody put the retail in the worst position. Where you would really want to sit and look at the Caldera, you were in a retail space. So we took that out, redid the restaurants, put a new kitchen in, renovated all the rooms, and it’s really nice. A lot of people were nervous about what we were doing because they love that building so much. That’s maybe another example of being bold and not being afraid to do what’s right. And you know, sometimes that takes bold action.

Paula: Yes, and Hawaii is very protective of its land.

Eric Nelson: Exactly, exactly. But what they see is not really the landmark that it once was. It had been modified and changed so much that they had no real idea of the beauty of the building when it was originally built.

Note: Paula de la Cruz is a botanical artist and writer based in New York. A link to her entire podcast episode follows: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/paloola/id1539854570#episodeGuid=1b442423-aa5f-4adb-b2f5-b078580194aa

When Should I Remove Snow from My Roof?

When Should I Remove Snow from My Roof?

When Should I Remove Snow from My Roof?
Photos of Paradise Inn Annex by Jeff Caven

When Should I Remove Snow from My Roof?

by Scott Bohne, AIA, NCARB, CCS, CCCA, LEED AP

DATE PUBLISHED: APR 1, 2021 

Occasionally, we are asked “When is the right time to remove snow from my roof?” Unfortunately, this is a difficult question to answer. It depends on the amount of snow and the amount of snow drifting your roof is experiencing. It also depends greatly on the water content of the snow. New snow may be very dry, light, and fluffy. Old snow may begin to break down and consolidate. Think of the snow like a sponge. If the weather warms and we get rain, the snow absorbs that water.

How much does snow weigh?

The weight of snow may vary between 5 and 20 pounds per cubic foot depending on the density and water content. You must also consider the depth of the snow drift that may occur on your roof. Winds may deposit large quantities of snow around changes in roof elevation.  The total weight being applied to your roof is not only determined by the amount of snow that falls, but also the snow that drifts on the roof.

Another factor may be whether your roof has been holding or shedding the accumulated snow. Snow accumulation on a metal roof with good slope may be minimal. An asphalt shingle roof with minimal slope, or a low slope roof, may hold all the snow that falls and drifts on it. Ice is very heavy. An ice dam forming at your roof eave weighs 57 pounds per cubic foot, (4.75 pounds per inch of thickness). The water forming behind the ice dam may weigh 5.2 pounds per inch of thickness. Ice dams may not only exceed the load capacity of your roof, they may also lead to rotted plywood. Those pretty icicles are an indicator that your roof has an ice damming problem.

So now that you know the facts, what’s next? 


Commercial Building Owners

  1. Understand what loads your structure can handle and understand the weight of snow so that you can monitor accumulation and drift areas so snow can be removed at the appropriate time. A structural engineer can analyze your roof and provide you with valuable information regarding snow and snow drift capacity.
  2. Listen to your structure. If you hear creaking and groaning, you’re on borrowed time.
  3. Monitor the roof for snow loading. Weigh the snow by removing a set amount and weighing it.
  4. We recommend using 5-gallon buckets to invert, load, remove, and weigh.
  5. Make sure your roof drains are clear of ice and debris. A clogged roof drain restricts the water from getting off the roof.
  6. If you have concerns or doubts, hire a roofing company that is licensed, bonded, and insured to remove the snow from your roof.

Residential Homeowners

  1. Listen to your structure. If you hear creaking and groaning, you’re on borrowed time. Monitor your interior doors and gypsum board. If the doors start to stick or you see cracks in the gypsum board at the door openings, your structure may be overloaded.
  2. Monitor the roof for snow loading. Weigh the snow by removing a set amount and weighing it. We recommend using 5-gallon buckets to invert, load, remove, and weigh.
  3. Be sure that your gutters, downspouts, and drains are open and draining properly. If they are frozen shut, call a specialist to utilize methods such as steaming to open the drains, gutters, and downspouts.
  4. Never shovel the roof completely clear. This may damage the roofing and the roof flashings. Leave 6 inches of snow for your footing, and to protect the roofing.
  5. Install heat tape where appropriate to reduce ice dams or cut channels in the dams to relieve the water that may back up behind the dam.
  6. If you have concerns or doubts, hire a roofing company that is licensed and bonded to remove the snow from your roof.

Scott Bohne, a Principal in the Anchorage office, brings 40 years of architectural experience. He has taught roofing on the university level and heads RIM’s Specifications Department and Exterior Thermal Envelope Studio, which emphasizes roofing repairs and replacements.

Mauna Lani Receives Multiple Industry Awards

Mauna Lani Receives Multiple Industry Awards

Mauna Lani Receives Multiple Industry Awards

DATE PUBLISHED: APR 1, 2021 

Images provided by Mauna Lani Auberge Resorts Collections

Mauna Lani Receives Multiple Industry Awards

The Mauna Lani, Auberge Resorts Collection is the recipient of the best Hotel Renovation and Restoration project by AHEAD, the Awards for Hospitality Experience and Design. The AHEAD Awards (www.aheadawards.com) recognizes exceptional design in all forms and the guest experiences created in hospitality projects worldwide. RIM Architects served as Architect of Record, Hart Howerton served as Design Architect, and Meyer Davis provided Interior Design for this award-winning renovation project.

Additionally, Mauna Lani was a finalist in Hospitality Design’s 2020 competition in the Luxury Public Space and Resort category: https://hospitalitydesign.com/news/business-people/hd-awards-winners-2020/

For Architectural Digest’s inaugural list of Hotel Award winners, which recognized great design even when travel was disrupted,
Mauna Lani made the prestigious list: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/ads-inaugural-hotel-award-winners

Sustainability and the Impact of COVID-19

Sustainability and the Impact of COVID-19

Sustainability and the Impact of COVID-19

DATE PUBLISHED: APR 1, 2021 

RIM created this sustainability graphic to honor the importance of incorporating sustainability into our daily lives and our projects.

Sustainability and the Impact of COVID 19

While the challenges presented by COVID 19 have been unprecedented, RIM’s Sustainability Group would like to highlight some of the positive sustainable outcomes we have witnessed within our firm. While it’s easy to understand how RIM’s carbon footprint has drastically decreased with less commutes to the office, less business travel, and a hunker down lifestyle, we were surprised to learn how our office supply use changed.

A few data estimates from each of our locations are described below. 

  • Alaska’s office ordered 75% less supplies than budgeted for in 2020.
  • Hawaii’s office ordered 65% less supplies than 2019.
  • Guam’s office supply purchases were down 50% compared to 2019.
  • Tustin’s office supply usage is at 10% of their normal consumption.
  • San Francisco’s paper printing has gone down 95% on documents due to use of Bluebeam Revu.
  • Travel expenses for the Results Group saw a 69% decrease in 2020.

As we slowly return to the office and into the new normal or continue to work from home, how do we plan to improve our sustainable practices? Our accounting department in Hawaii has made an effort to go paperless with the majority of their files. Working from home without a printer has forced many of our staff to learn to use technology for redlines and other day-to-day office tasks. RIM intends to continue the trend of reducing our footprint in 2021 and beyond.