Auberge at Mauna Lani

Auberge at Mauna Lani

COMMERCIAL / HOSPITALITY

Auberge at Mauna Lani

ROLE: Architect of Record, Construction Administration
CLIENT: DHL Mahi Associates LLC, an affilicate of California company ProspectHill Group
PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of Mauna Lani, Auberge Resorts Collection Press
PRESS: Auberge at Mauna Lani Opens 

RIM served as Architect of Record for the newly opened Mauna Lani Hotel, located on the Kona Coast of the Island of Hawaii. As the first Auberge Resorts property in the Aloha State, this popular, luxury hotel was thoughtfully redesigned to celebrate the history, archaeology, nature, and culture that make its site unique. The resort includes 333 guest rooms, suites and private bungalows, three new pools including one with an infinity-edge for adults only, and a state-of-the-art fitness center and spa. The centerpiece of the resort’s cultural heritage is a 15-acre fishpond complex, dating back to the 1200s. Mauna Lani, which means “mountains reaching heaven,” is also home to 27 parks and two historic trails sprinkled with ancient artifacts. 

The famous Canoe House, which is the resort’s iconic signature restaurant, was largely preserved structurally, maintaining the large volume ceilings and heavy timber beams. The interior and exterior spaces, including the central bar, are completely new with a wide range of casual seating options and exquisite décor. Recognized as the kitchen where modern Hawaiian cuisine pioneer Alan Wong made his mark, Canoe House is carrying on the tradition under Chef Matt Raso. 

Paradise Inn Annex

Paradise Inn Annex

COMMERCIAL / HOSPITALITY

Paradise Inn Annex

ROLE: Architect
CLIENT: National Park Service

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as a National Historic Landmark, the Paradise Inn Annex in Mount Rainier National Park (Washington) reopened following a 19-month closure of the Annex wing for rehabilitation and upgrading. The massive effort, led by RIM, encompassed extensive work on both the interior and exterior, performed during severe winter conditions and at 5,400 feet altitude.    

Originally constructed in 1920, the 2017-2019 restoration/renovation of the Annex brought the structure up to date with current seismic and life/safety codes. Not only was the exterior stone foundation preserved, but original interior features such as crown molding and windows were meticulously restored. Key components of this project included removal of previous undesirable modernizations to the interior of the building, the reintroduction of the Annex’s historic interior and exterior appearance, and the retainage of the few remaining defining materials. Additionally, the work included electrical, plumbing, fire safety, and seismic code compliance as well as soundproofing, insulation, energy efficient lighting, and more. 

Eielson Visitor Center

Eielson Visitor Center

CIVIC & CULTURAL

Eielson Visitor Center

ROLE: Architect, Planner 
CLIENT: National Park Service
SUSTAINABILITY: LEED Platinum 
AWARDS:

Citation Award; American Institute of Architects (AIA) Alaska; Members’ Choice Awards [Most Alaskan; Liked the Best; Most Original Design], American Institute of Architects (AIA) Alaska 

Located 67 miles inside the pristine beauty of Denali National Park and Preserve, the visitor center was designed to blend harmoniously with the surrounding wilderness. Durable materials were required to withstand the extremes of winter and to perform in accordance with LEED Platinum Certification. The partial submersion of the building preserves the astonishing view of Mt. McKinley while offering panoramic views at the roof deck’s observation lookout.

Alaska Islands & Visitor Center

Alaska Islands & Visitor Center

CIVIC & CULTURAL

Alaska Islands & Visitor Center

ROLE:  Architect
CLIENT:  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
AWARDS:

2005 Merit Award for Excellence in Architecture – American Institute of Architects, AK Chapter

2005 Design for Life Award-Public Buildings; American Society of Interior Designers, WA Chapter

This visitor center is sited on a natural bluff with occupied spaces arranged along the southern façade to maximize views of Kachemak Bay. The intent is for all occupants to feel a connection with coastal Alaska. Thus, the building orients itself toward the sea coast, and turns its back on the adjacent highway. The coastal façade is open and inviting, while the urban façade incorporates solid sound buffer walls to reinforce the permanence of the institutions housed within. The upper and lower floors remain connected visually by means of open areas or overlooks. Other connections to nature include access to interpretive trails and various outdoor amenities such as an amphitheater and plazas. 

The building was programmed as an important community element, having a distinct local identity and expressing a strong historical association with artisans. Hence, the design team commissioned original works within the building to integrate with the architecture. The seamless result has been well received. 

  

This 35,000 SF facility is shared by the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and the Kachemak Bay Research Reserve.  It is essentially divided into three distinct functional components: Visitor Facilities, Educational Program Spaces, and Headquarter Offices. An 832 SF laboratory and research area provide space for scientific research of marine wildlife and educational purposes. 

  

General Contractor:  Jay-Brant General Contractors, Homer 

Alyeska Roundhouse

Alyeska Roundhouse

COMMERCIAL / HOSPITALITY

Alyeska Roundhouse

ROLE: Architect
CLIENT: Seibu Alaska, Inc.

The Alyeska Roundhouse was originally built in 1960 at the upper terminus of Chair 1 at Mount Alyeska. RIM’s connection to the Roundhouse project spans over a decade. During the late 1990’s, RIM was involved in early concept planning to restore the structure, serving as the main interface with the National Park Service regarding its historical preservation. RIM continued the partnership by providing information for a business plan to fund the rehabilitation of the facility. In 2003, the building was placed on the National Historic Register.

 

Overall, the project was completed in four phases: design, foundation and support construction, roof system and interior renovation, and finally interpretive display. During the interior renovation and interpretive display phases, comments gathered from a large stakeholder group were integrated into the design of the facility. The stakeholders’ input played a key role in the direction and execution of the design.